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and cut out. >>> the u.s. may decide to withhold millions in military aid to pakistan. this is according to a "new york times" report. the u.s. is said to be unhappy with the efforts that pakistani army has been making against the taliban as well as al qaeda. as well as $800 million in assistance could be suspended. this could cause some major problems. if pakistan takes tougher action, the aid could resume. mean while, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan. panetta is meeting with american military leaders and afghan officials. nbc's atia abawi is in kabul this morning. bring us up to speed on what leon panetta is saying that al qaeda is basically on the run and close to being completely stamped out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. the new secretary of defense's first trip as the defense secretary here in afghanistan, prior to arriving he talked to reporters on the plane about how he feels alg al qaeda is going right now, the war against terror. he says the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach, primarily pointing the the death of bin laden, the information they got
ceiling snowdown. the handover in afghanistan today. and more trouble with pakistan. we'll talk to the intelligence chair. still ahead, uk hacking scandal claims another top official at scotland yard. send me your thoughts on twitter. this is "andrea mitchell this is "andrea mitchell reports" only on msnbc. a network of possibilities. in here, the planned combination of at&t and t-mobile would deliver our next generation mobile broadband experience to 55 million more americans, many in small towns and rural communities, giving them a new choice. we'll deliver better service, with thousands of new cell sites... for greater access to all the things you want, whenever you want them. it's the at&t network... and what's possible in here is almost impossible to say. an accident doesn't have to slow you down. with better car replacement, available only with liberty mutual auto insurance, if your car is totaled, we give you the money for a car one model year newer. to learn more, visit us today. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> you're watching live pictures of the rose garden. th
pakistan at this point. most of the terrorist attacks that take place in india, at least in this region of india, are traced back to pakistani groups or pakistani-sponsored group and one group coming to mash lashkare tayyiba. they have been traced back to pakistani militant groups. this is not particularly happening at a great time. you're seeing a lot of attention right now between the u.s. and pakistan, and if it's traced back to the same groups, that tension will only increase in a couple of days. >> i just learned from our producers, the associated press confirming 21 people dead as a result of the terror attacks. as i mentioned, president obama has condemned these attacks, and you brought up the key issue, responsibility, and if there's any links to pakistan at this very questionable time when we look at the relationship between the united states and pakistan, even including the removal or no longer giving pakistan that $800 million in aid. >> yeah. let's not forget, i mean, there are allegations out there, including allegations mounted by all three things the u.s. justice departme
times" says the u.s. may suspend military aid to pakistan as defense secretary leon panetta visits afghanistan, the paper reports the possible halt of $800 million in assistance and equipment. that could have an effect on u.s. troops in afghanistan. the report says the aid could resume if pakistan takes tougher action against the taliban as well as al qaeda. meanwhile, secretary panetta told reporters on the plane it's time to focus on defeating al qaeda once and for all. >> i think we had undermined their ablthd to conduct 9/11-type attacks. we had them on the run. >> secretary panetta met with american military officials. atia abawi is in afghanistan. good morning. bring us up to date. >> good morning. panetta's very first trip as secretary of defense to afghanistan, before he landed he brought up the situation with al qaeda. he said, quote, the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach. this is a time to go after him, especially after bin laden. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden, to put maximum pressure on them bec
panetta visited in afghanistan. he failed to visit pakistan. what do you think that says about the tension? >> the tension is quite high. frankly unless there is some reversal and lowering of the rhetoric, then i think it's going to spin in a very deep decline. that's not something that's in pakistan's interest on the united states. you need to keep conversations as private as possible sending very strong messages but if we continue to vent our frustrations mutual frustrations ours with the pakistanis and what they have done and fail to do theirs with us in terms of us trying to micro manage what they're doing, then your going to have a break or breach in that relationship. pakistan is a major non-nato ally. allies don't allow things to happen like the hosting of the con sealing of bin laden or the arresting of those who help take bin laden down or allegedly the targeting for assassination of a journalist who's been critical of the regime. these are not the acts of allies. we've got to get back to a level of respect and trust i think that's lacking right now. as a result the relationship i
adviser when he says we need to cresco verdict action in pakistan? >> i think what's clear, pakistanis not doing everything they can to crack down on al qaeda. they have certain limitations they can't live up to. but for whatever reason, they are not doing everything they can. and what the raid that killed bin laden proved, there are things the u.s. can do, perhaps without the consent of the pakistani government that can accelerate the process, this is brought up by dennis blair the other day. drone strikes, violations of sovereignty. are we creating more problems than we solve? are we threatening diplomatic relationships with key relationships with pakistan and yemen without consulting the governments. >> given you say it's become amorphed into an ideological princip principle, does that mean we can never stamp it out entirely? >> i won't say ever, but they have their own leadership structures in each country. even if we get rid of al qaeda in afghanistan or pakistan, we won't simply wipe it out in every country this is an organization that will be with us for decades, one way or anot
, which is also the problem of pakistan, becomes a regional problem in which the country's in the region have a stake in solving and are not -- there's a reasonable chance that can be pulled off. >> dr. brzezinski, you mentioned pakistan. the focus of policy leaders. turning away from afghanistan, we got reports the journalist who was killed by the isi inside pakistan further out is complicating our relationship with that group. we announced going in to kill osama bin laden. how do we manage this relationship that's been difficult to manage for as far as the eye can see? >> well, first of all, we have to recognize we are dealing here with two sifrl conflicts. one in afghanistan and the one in pakistan. there's a conflict in pakistan. there isn't a foreign intervention trying to resolve it. it is a great internal conflict. what we are seeing in pakistan is a series of contradictory policies, contradictory engagements and contradictory engagements. the army wants to preserve a stable pakistan that is assured of security and sees the united states as a component of the success in that quest
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
as well. pat. >> dr. brzezinski, let me talk to you about pakistan. powers flu out, richard nixon tilted, doctor brzezinski was over there looking down the pass. they were a great ally in the cold war. now it looks like we have lost pakistan. have we lost pakistan? if so, why and was it inevitable. >> i think we are losing pakistan. i don't know if we have lost it yet. if we disengage intelligently and engage in the umbrella i have been talking about, her happens we will lose it all together. i think the fault is two way. first of all, we have never been really consistently and comprehensively sensitive to the political interests in having a secure backyard in afghanistan. we just haven't. resently, we played with indi s indians. we give a super nuclear deal to the indians. we did not give it to the pakistanis. there's resentment there. pakistan is coming undone on its own. it's not all our undoing. there's a conflict between the army and society at large. divisions between the army and the military and intelligence. ethnic differences. regional differences in pakistan. plus, this overw
. pakistan? where would you focus your attention? >> pakistan's an important challenge. there's not much we can do about it. we've tried all sorts of things there and nothing seems to work. i would say revitalizing our relationships in asia and the pacific. that's where history the going to be written in the 21st surgeriry. i would say involved there. better relations with ind ka ya with the countries of southeast asia. doing something about our energy situation that we're less vulnerable on vagaries of price and supply that would go a long way. again, i'd focus more at home on competitiveness, on improving our immigration policy. on the quality of our schools. on the quality of our transportation infrastructure and so forth. again, we have got to retore the foundations of american power. that's a prerequisite if we're going to lead in the world either by what we do or our example. >> restoration is the theme. i hope it's the subject of the next book. thanks so much for joining us. >> thanks, andrea. >> it's very provocative richard. >>> a word of warning the images you're about to see is h
is occurring in yemen? >> pakistan is probably larger than any of them. afghanistan is a distraction. one thing about afghanistan, when you had the attacks on the hotel, it went back to vietnam. it's a reminder the people we are working with in afghanistan, given what they get out of pakistan, they will not be able to turn the corner. we continue to invest enormously there. >> howard dean? >> afghanistan, because of the leadership there, no matter what we do, it doesn't matter. karzai is hopeless. i'm more optimistic. if you look at it over many, many years, tunisia is a bright star. egypt is not going to be a democracy in the way we know it. yemen is a huge problem. libya, who knows. i think there's progress that's been made here. i agree there's a lot of countries not making progress. syria, who knows what's going to happen. there will be real gains. >> i kind of agree with governor dean. in yemen, if we have what you describe, the potential for ungovernable state, it will become a petri dish of groups. they may be highly dysfunctional, but not failed. how does the u.s. not send some kind of
the east to the pakistan border. that's where i spent my time. we're starting to see a lot of the flow from fighters coming from pakistan. >> let me ask you, drawn down 33,000 troops by september of next year, good shape in kandahar and helmand province. how can you maintain momentum and win a war when you're pulling out 1/3 of the best soldiers you've got. >> a couple of things, one, we're having as we had with a bond conference in 2001. what's interesting is as we were talking about troop deployments and actual mission and strategy, we're in the process of escalating the troop numbers. now we're having the reconciliation with the taliban and networks, etc., as we're decelerating. that factors in to the larger conversation. the second thing that's important to remember about the troop assignments is how many will be combat troops or support troops. what are the areas you're going to pen trade in to and hold on to the areas as well. >> "the new york times" reporting this morning that the obama administration officials believe that pakistan's spy agency ordered the killing of a pakistani jou
pakistan, as we said on the show a number of times. how do we deal with pakistan and at the same time, get out of afghanistan except in terms of special forces or drones to represent our interest and chase down terrorists? meanwhile, you have the greatest tender box in the world, to save a nuclear pakistan with more than 100, probably twice as many with nuclear warheads that can fall into the hands of terrorists. >> the bottom line is, how do we deal with it? >> it's always pakistan is a basket case, a nuclear basket case. stay in afghanistan. >> you don't. you don't. >> it's not going to work. that is washington's argument, mike barnicle. pakistan is stabilized. we have to keep having american troops killed in afghanistan. it doesn't add up. invading cambodia is the right move when you are going into vietnam. >> continuing argument and keep making it because less than 1% of american families and american people are serving in the military in afghanistan. >> there you go. >> back to the draft. >> untouched. >> we need a draft. >> we'll come back the dr. aidan quinn. [ male announcer ] memb
that occurred originally back in the '40s between india and pakistan, a couple hundred muslims live inside -- >> millions. that's okay. >> live inside india and there are extremist groups with india as opposed to pakistani base that go over to india responsible for similar small-scale attacks. so nobody is clear yet who it is, but i think you're right. the fact that indian officials didn't immediately blame or cast doubt that it was pakistan suggests that they don't think it is. >> and also you just made a point we were talking ak. 200 million muslims in country of india makes india one of the largest -- the largest muslim country in the world? >> exactly. indonesia and india, countries with the largest number of muslims in the world. indians often present that evidence to westerners. >> sure. >> saying we know how to work closely with our multiple populations. we're a large democracy and see how things go so well. it doesn't always go so well in that country. >> move to syria. both in new york and washington we're obsess with the debt talks and defaulting and obviously for important reaso
by a pakistani terror group in 2008 that killed 166 people. pakistan condemned yesterday's violence, and representatives from both countries are expected to meet later this month. secretary of state hillary clinton also condemned the bombings and said that she will go ahead with plans to visit india next week. >>> sarah palin is now giving a rough time frame on whether or not she will join the 2012 race. the former alaska governor telling fox news last night she will announce her intentions in late august or early september. this comes after her comments in the latest issue of "newsweek" where she said, quote, "i could win." in a cryptic statement last night, the former vice presidential candidate said she's still thinking. >> you know, i did say in that article that i believed that i could win, and then i went on to say, but it doesn't have to be me. i'm not so egotistical to say it can only be me to turn this country around. if there are those out there willing to serve with good executive experience who have that servant's heart and know not to be so obsessively partisan that the
wednesday. the attacks came just months after india resumed peace talks with pakistan. so far no group has taken responsibility for the bombings, and indian officials are not speculating on who may have been behind the blast. secretary of state hillary clinton says she will proceed with plans to visit the country next week. now here's your first look at some of the other news going on around america today. >>> video from a dash cam has three tennessee sheriff's deputies in hot water. the officers took down an allegedly intoxicated man then repeatedly punched, kicked, and tazed him. while the man was handcuffed and half naked, the officers claim he was resisting arrest. the incident is now under investigation, and all three officers have been placed on administrative leave. >>> an attorney in louisiana is forced to answer some tough questions after surveillance video showed him fighting in a bar located in the town he represents. the attorney said he was defending himself, and he sued the bar for lack of security. the owners countersued, saying the attorney's bar tab was unpaid. >>> in ohio
and fighters to the bases in pakistan and afghanistan. let's get to part of what the "wall street journal" said. the quote reads they outlined what they said was a fund-raising operation that uses iran-based operatives and draws from donors in persian gulf companies. the treasury said they sanctioned six for allegedly overseeing this network. >> how concerned are you when you hear this report and what does this mean? >> it's difficult to understand at first. you look at what happens and you see militias confronting al qaeda and a lot of people die. it's difficult to imagine the allies. what's amazing is there has been evidence and through other sources that does tend to confirm the fact that iran is a major location from money laundering and cross transit into afghanistan. it is operating as a portal for the taliban and al qaeda. why is iran doing this? probably not for idea logical reasons. they wanted to reach a deal and ever since then they have been holding this issue. there have been high ranking members that are allowed to live in iran. the question is what games do they want to play? >>
to attack pakistan, they can declare that as a saving too. but here's the problem, and the congressman stated it well. there are aspects of the two plans that are acceptable, and the president has vetoed those, and that is why mitch mcconnell is saying to harry reid, look, you're not going to impose your plan on a senate, 47 members who are republicans, we're going to have to deal. and i think they are going to deal, alex. they're going to send something back over to the house, and i think the house will probably have to pass it on monday or tuesday. >> okay. morris, did you think harry reid has given up too many with this bill, and do you think he's going to have to give up more to get republican support? >> i think there's going to be a lot of compromise. and remember, compromise is not a bad word. in this town, some days compromise seems like a bad word, but that's what you do when you negotiate. when you don't have an absolute majority, you have to give a little to get a little. and for some reason, this town has lost that understanding, that it is really not about whose parties ar
. information found by u.s. navy zeals when they invatd bin laden's compound in pakistan show the strains inside bin laden's terror network. he was spending as much time dealing with al qaeda's struggles as he was dealing with no terror attacks. good morning. >> good morning, alex. >> what's this information telling us? >> a great deal about the organization which was now fragmented, difficult to control and finance. apparently riddled with trade traitors. it demonstrates that osama bin laden was obsessed with the follow up attack on the united states after 9/11. despite the fact that lots oof people in the organization wanted to work harder to establish a -- across the muslim war. he was focused on the united states and a big follow up, a big splashy attack which never occurred. >> all this from this new report in "the washington post" telling us al qaeda groups were complaining about the drone attacks which shows that they were working. >> they were indeed. matter of fact a large number of complaints about drone attacks. he himself in several emails talked about his concern that his ranks were
that the u.s. owes it to the world to come to a solution and to do it quickly. further afield in pakistan there are worries about the loss of badly needed aid and the impact on anti-terrorism initiatives there, and israel is also saying that this threatens the position that the u.s. holds in the world and this could be construed as a sign of real weakness by countries like iran. here in the u.k. there's a feeling that internal u.s. political wranglings are posing a real threat, alex, to the world financial systems. >> yeah. how about the headlines that people are waking up to over there? are they pretty bold? >> well, actually, you know, it's not really making front page news at the moment. you know, it's -- there is a lot of reaction, and it's been reported as political theater. some of the hldz, though, are about savers desserting the stock because of the debt crisis, how the u.s. is playing with fire as the deadline looms, but, as i say, it's not front page news yet. there are some funny asides. one paper called is debt-ageddon and one says apple has much more cash than the u.s. govern
afghanistan, pakistan. you're reading a couple pieces in the "new york times." now it's spreading to all of these different countries and one that really jumped off the page for me, drone attacks in somalia. >> joining us, jeremy scahill, on the cia secret sites in somalia, jeremy, the secret training programs and secret prisons out of somalia is part of your reporting there. how big a threat are these terrorist group there's? >> we should say first of all president obama campaigned on a promise to go up against these bush era policies declaring war on the world, running secret sites, torturing prisoners. deeply involved in an underground dungeon officially run by the somali national security agency, but their salaries are paid by the cia directly. in fact, one somali agent described thousand hairli ed ho and paid by u.s. agents and the u.s. is interrogating prisoners, including those rendered by the kenyan government, snatched off the streets in nairobi based on u.s. intelligence and taken to this secret prison and interrogated. it goes against the president's ordered he signed in janua
of the wars in afghanistan and pakistan. >> still not getting serious. >> i went away from fuzzy. >> is that like jerry at trick math? >> yes. >> are you surprised they don't have a deal today? i actually really -- i mean, i really thought -- >> i would be shocked if they don't have a deal in the next two or three days. again, republican freshmen may have a big ideology difference with barack obama and his world view, and the divide is no greater than ronald reagan's was with tip o'neal in 1983 when they sat down, and they did a kneel. yes, you differ with barack obama and the democrats, but -- >> usually you are good at seeing somebody's angle. like you know what their angle was. what is the angle here? i don't get it. >> these republicans believe this is their only opportunity -- >> are they so stuck to the contract with the tea party they cannot think outside the box for the good of the country? seriously? >> can i finish? you asked a question and i need to finish. they understand one thing. >> what do they understand? >> they are dead right about this. this is their best chan
lethal and could become explosive. >> pakistan. >> it is. harold ford, make no mistake of it. i saw this as a small government conservative. i say this as a free market capitalist. i will tell you a lot of people who voted for pat buchan nab two times for president would agree with me here that if you have hedge fund managers pays significantly less in taxes, our secretaries, our schoolteachers, if you have the largest corporations on the planet paying 0% in u.s. taxes, that is going to cause eventually social unrest. that's not a democratic issue or a republican issue. >> that's a problem. >> global financial institutions including imf made clear -- this challenge, unemployment and the growing disparity are the greatest threats. the question i have for dr. brzenszki, this morning, what advice would you have to achieve the most articulate and succinct frame -- i heard your frame of it, why we find ousts in this mess, the kind of shared sacrifi sacrifice. a week away from it. how do you do it, doctor. >> i think the majority in this country which involves moderate and responsible rep
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23